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U.S. Customs provides guidance for Canadian truckers working to supply British Colubia

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U.S. Customs and Border Protection have announced a guidance document to help alleviate supply chains issues caused by flooding and mudslides in British Columbia:

 “Due to extreme weather conditions in British Columbia, Canada, that have caused flooding, landslides, road closures, and other supply chain disruptions Canadian domestic truck carriers may need to transit through the U.S. to reach destinations in Canada,” the November 18 release reads.

“Any Canadian carriers that currently operate between the US and Canada as well as domestically are encouraged to follow the standard procedures for transit, including the advance filing of an electronic truck manifest and utilization of an in-bond or in-transit transaction.  This will facilitate crossing and decrease delay at the border that will be caused by these temporary measures.

The requirements below are designed to be utilized by Canadian domestic truck carriers that don’t normally cross the border in the normal course of their business:

  • Any Canadian carriers that currently operate between the US and Canada as well as domestically are expected to follow the standard procedures for transit, including the advance filing of an electronic truck manifest and utilization of an in-bond or in-transit transaction. 
  • This will facilitate crossing and decrease delay at the border that will be caused by these temporary measures. 
  • CBP will exercise maximum flexibility regarding these domestic freight shipments.  It is recommended that carriers have normal clearance documents readily available such as bill of lading, invoices, etc. to facilitate clearance. 

To read the full document including general rules, travel documents required and entry filing requirements, visit this link:

CSMS #50138288 – CBP Guidance to Alleviate Supply Chain Disruptions in British Columbia, Canada, November 18, 2021